Texas Representative Introduces Bill to Decriminalize Marijuana

State Rep. Joe Moody, a Democrat from El Paso, introduced a bill on Monday to decriminalize small amounts of marijuana in the Texas House of Representatives. The measure, House Bill 63, was submitted by Moody on the first day of the pre-filing period for the 2019 legislative session. Continue reading “Texas Representative Introduces Bill to Decriminalize Marijuana”

After Cannabis, Canadian Government Won’t Decriminalize Any Other Drugs

Despite the legalization of cannabis currently underway in Canada, the country will not be decriminalizing any other drugs, according to a government official. Thierry Belair, a spokesman for Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor, told the CBC that the federal government has no plans for further decriminalization. The government announcement comes amid calls from major Canadian cities to remove criminal penalties for the consumption and possession of small amounts of drugs. Continue reading “After Cannabis, Canadian Government Won’t Decriminalize Any Other Drugs”

Iowa bill reducing marijuana penalties faces obstacles

A proposal in the Iowa Legislature to lessen penalties for people who possess small amounts of marijuana for the first time would save the state money and reduce the disproportionate number of African-Americans in its criminal justice system. Continue reading “Iowa bill reducing marijuana penalties faces obstacles”

Pot Decriminalization Law Goes into Effect in New Hampshire

A law in New Hampshire decriminalizing the possession of small amounts of marijuana goes into effect Saturday.

The law reduces the penalty for possession of up to three-quarters of an ounce (21 grams) of marijuana and a much smaller amount of hashish from a criminal misdemeanor to a civil violation with fines up to $300. New Hampshire joins more than 20 states, including all of New England, in easing criminal penalties on pot.

Continue reading “Pot Decriminalization Law Goes into Effect in New Hampshire”

Vermont’s Supreme Court to Consider Cannabis ‘Sniff Test’

Vermont’s highest court is set to consider a case involving whether the simple smell of cannabis constitutes legal grounds to search and seize a driver’s vehicle.

In 2014, police in Vermont pulled over driver Greg Zullo, claiming his license plate was partially obscured by snow. After approaching Zullo’s car, a state trooper claimed he could smell cannabis and asked to search the vehicle. Continue reading “Vermont’s Supreme Court to Consider Cannabis ‘Sniff Test’”